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An Unbiased Spectral Line Survey toward R CrA IRS7B in the 

345 GHz Window with ASTE 



Yoshimasa Watanabe^, Nami Sakai^, Johan E. Lindberg^'^, Jes K. J0rgensen^'^, 
Suzanne E. Bisschop^''^ and Satoshi Yamamoto^ 



ABSTRACT 



We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332 - 364 GHz region with the 
ASTE 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 
or Class 0/1 transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary 
observations in the 450 GHz band. In total, 16 molecular species are identified 
in the 332 - 364 GHz region. Strong emission lines of CN and CCH are observed, 
whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules which are 
characteristics of hot corino and warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) source, 
respectively, are not detected. The rotation temperature of CH3OH is evaluated 
to be 31 K, which is significantly lower than that reported for the prototypical hot 
corino IRAS 16293-2422 (~85 K). The deuterium fractionation ratios for CCH 
and H2CO are obtained to be 0.038 and 0.050, respectively, which are much lower 
than those in the hot corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in 
R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and 
C-C3H2, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as 
a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC 
and hot corino chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions 
of low-mass Class sources, R CrA 1RS7B would be a source with a mixture of 
these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae 
star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey 
demonstrates further chemical diversity in low-mass star-forming regions. 



^Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan 

^Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, 
0ster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K., Denmark 

■^Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0., Den- 
mark 



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Subject headings: ISM: individual (R CrA IRS7B) — ISM: molecules — stars: 
protostars 



1. Introduction 



One of the key issues in low-mass star formation studies is to observationally address 
how the interstellar matter is brought into a protoplanetary disk. This is of fundamen- 
tal importance, since it is eventually related to the origin of rich materials in our solar 
system. A great advance toward this direction in the last decade was the recognition 



of warm inner regions around low-mass protostars (jBlake et al.l Il994l : Ivan Dishoeck et al. 



1995: Ceccarelli et al. 1998. 2000: Schoier et al. 2002f), and the detection of various com- 



plex organic molecules including HCOOCH3, (0113)20, and C2H5CN i n four Class pro- 



tostars, IRAS 16293-2422, NGO 1333 IRAS4A, IRAS4B, and IRAS2A fICazaux et al. 



Bottinelli et al.l 



2004, 



2007 



Kua.n et al.l |2004J : |j0rgensen et al.l l2005al : lOhandler et al. 



2003 



2005 



Sakai et al. I2OO6 : Bisschop et al. 20081 ). Although these complex organic molecules had long 



been recognized as molecules which are characteristic to hot cores in high-mass star-forming 
regions, it is now evident that some low-mass star-forming regions harbor them in a high 
temperature (> 100 K) and high density (> 10^ cm~^) region around a protostar, called hot 
corino. So far, only four hot corinos are known and three of them belong to the Perseus 
region, and hence, whether the hot corino phenomenon is common among protostars is still 
unclear (See the review by iHerbst fc van Dishoeckl ( 120091 )). 



As a counter example, ISakai et al.l ( 120081 . l2009al ) found that some Class objects have 
completely different chemical compositions. Prototypical examples are L1527 in Taurus and 
IRAS 15398-3359 in Lupus, where various carbon-chain molecules such as C4H, C4H2, and 
HC5N are extremely abundant. In contrast to the hot corino case, the complex organic 
molecules are deficient in these sources. Carbon-chain molecules are thought to be produced 
from CH4 evaporated from grain mantles by protostellar activities (Warm Carbon-Chain 
Chemistry; WCCC). The known sources showing hot corino and WCCC characteristics are , 
however, all Class sources according to their bolometric temperature ( lEvans et al.ll2009l ). 
The two groups of sources are therefore also not necessarily just protostars in different 
evolutionary stages. 

This discussion also illustrates the chemical diversity of protostars: some associated with 
hot corinos, some showing molecules related to the WCCC activities, and some neither. One 
interpretation of such a chemical diversity is that the hot corinos and the WCCC sources 



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may represent the two extremes with respect to chemical compositions of Class young 
stellar objects. If so, there should exist a protostellar core that possesses the intermediate 
characteristics. ISakai et al.l ( l2009a[ ) carried out a C4H survey toward 17 low-mass protostars, 
and found that the C4H abundance varies from source to source, where it is highest for the 
WCCC sources and lower for hot corinos. Sources between the two extremes indeed exist 
with respect to the C4H abundance. They proposed that the variation would originate 
from difference of the duration time of the starless-core phase. Alternatively, the other 
environmental effects such as UV radiation from nearby stars would also contribute to the 
chemical variation. Understanding an origin of the chemical diversity remains an important 
task. A particularly important method for this is an unbiased spectral line survey. 

Spectral line surveys have been carried out toward representative s ources with strong 
emission lines, suc h as high- mass star- forming regions (e.g. Orion KL; iBlake et al.l Il986 



Schilke et al.l 119971 ) . envelopes of late- type stars (e.g. IRC +10216; lAvery et al.lll992l ). and 



active nuclei in galaxies (e.g. NGC 253: lMartm et al.ll2006[ ). On the other hand, spectral line 



surveys toward low-mass star-forming sources and starless cores are relatively sparse. This is 
because unbiased line surveys for such regions need a lot of observation time due to weak and 



narrow emission L 


(Blake et al. 


1994; 


(Kaifu et al. 


2004) 



1994 ; Ivan Dishoeck et al.lll995l : ICaux et al.ll201ll ) and of the starless core TMC-1 



20041 ). Except for these two, the chemical compositions of low -mass star-forming 



regions have so far been studied by targeting only specific molecules (e.g. iMaret et al.ll2004l : 
J0rgensen et al.ll2005bl : iBottinelli et al.ll2007l ). Recent developments of the ALMA- type low 
noise receivers and wide-band auto-correlation spectrometers have made wide-band survey 
observations possible even toward the low-mass star-forming regions. 

With this in mind, we have conducted a spectral line survey toward the low-mass 
prot ostar R CrA IRS7B in the Corona Australis dark cloud at a distance of about 170 
pc (IKnude fc H0g||l998l ). The cloud is extended from south to north, lying almost per- 
pendicularly to the galactic plane . The total mass is estimated to be about 70 



(ICappa de Nicolau k. Poppellll99ll ). Around the Herbig Ae star R CrA, iHarju et al.l (119931 ) 
found a dense molecular cloud core (A2) based on the C^®0 obser vations using the SEST 
telescope. In the R CrA region, IRS7 is the most reddened source (ITaylor fc Storey Il984r) . 
Two contin uum peaks, IRS 7A and IRS7B, separated by 12" were detected by Brown (jl987 ) 
with VLA. iNutter et al.l (120051 ) identifi ed a Class protost ar in IRS7B by the 450 /xm and 
850 /im SCUBA observations, although ICroppi et al.l (120071 ) later suggested it to be objet in 
transition between Class and Class I. Toward this position, strong emission lines of H2CO 
and CH3OH were detected (ISchoier et al.ll2006l ). From these results, R CrA IRS7B has been 
thought as a hot corino candidate (Lindberg et al. in prep.). In this paper, we will present 
a spectral line survey toward R CrA IRS7B in the 345 GHz band. A related spectral line 



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survey covering frequencies between 218 and 245 GHz is being conducted with APEX, and 
will be reported separately (Lindberg et al. in prep.). 



2. Observations 

Observations towa rd R CrA IRS7B w ere carried out in June and August 2010 with the 



ASTE 10 m telescope flEzawa et al.ll2004l l The observed position was the SMA 220 GHz 
continuum peak (aj2ooo; ^J2ooo) = (IS'^ 01™ 56^4 , -36° 57' 28". 3) (Lindberg et al. in prep.). 
In the 345 GHz band, the beam size is ~22", and the main beam efficiency (r^mb) is ~60 %. A 
side-band separating (2SB) mixer receiver (CATS345) was used as a frontend, whose typical 
system temperature ranged from 200 to 500 K, depending on the atmospheric conditions. 
The backend was a bank of XF-type digital spectro-correlators (MAC), whose bandwidths 
are 512 MHz, all having 1024 spectral channels. The frequency resolution is 0.5 MHz, which 
corresponds to ~0.5 km s~^ at 345 GHz. This resolution is sufficient, since a typical line 
width for R CrA IRS7B is ~2 km s^^. A position-switching method was employed with 
the off-position at (Aa, A6) = (+30', 0.0'). The telescope pointing was checked once every 
hour by observing a bright point-like ^^CO(J = 3 — 2) source, V5104Sgr. The pointing 
accuracy was ensured to be better than 5". The intensity calibration was carried out by 
the chopper-wheel method. The antenna temperature (T^) is converted to the main-beam 
brightness temperature (Tmb) by Tmb = T^/r/mb {Vmh = 0.6). The intensity fluctuation from 
day to day was about 19 %, as evaluated from the ^^C0( J=3-2) intensity of V5104Sgr used 
for the pointing. The total observation time was 42 hours to cover the frequency range from 
332 GHz to 364 GHz. 

In addition to the observations in the 345 GHz band, some supplementary observations 
were carried out in the 450 GHz band with ASTE in November 2010. The ALMA Band 8 
qualified model receiver was used as a frontend. Since the observation time was limited (6 
hours), a few small frequency ranges covering important lines were observed. The covered 
frequency ranges are 435 - 437 GHz, 459.25 - 461.25 GHz, 490.0 - 490.5 GHz, and 491.0 - 
492.5 GHz. The beam size is ~ 17", and the main beam efficiency is ~ 50 % at 450 GHz. The 
same backend as for the 350 GHz observation (MAC) was used, whose velocity resolution 
at 450 GHz is ~0.3 km s^^. The scale is converted to the Tmb scale by using the 
main beam efficiency (r^mb = 0.5). A position-switching method was employed with the off 
position at (Aa, A6) = (+30', 0.0'), as in the case of the 345 GHz observation. The intensity 
calibration was carried out by the chopper-wheel method. A typical system temperature was 
800 - 2000 K, depending critically on the atmospheric condition and observing frequencies. 



The observed data were reduced with NEWSTAR, which is a software package developed 



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by NRO. Spectral baselines were subtracted by fitting a line-free part to the 5th - 7th 
order polynomial in a frequency range of 500 MHz. Distorted sub-scan spectra due to bad 
atmospheric conditions and instabilities of the receiver system, whose baseline could not be 
subtracted by fitting the polynomial curves, were excluded in the integration procedure. 



3. Results 

3.1. Overall Feature 

Figure [1] shows the compressed spectrum from 332 to 364 GHz, whereas Figure |2] shows 
its expansions of every 1 GHz interval. Typically, the r.m.s. noise ranges from 12 to 23 
mK in Tmb- In some parts of the spectrum, the periodic baseline distortion remains, which 
actually limits the sensitivity. 'Absorption-like' features with negative intensities can be 
seen in the spectrum, which are caused by telluric ozone (O3). In total, 89 emission lines are 
detected in the frequency range from 332 to 364 GHz (Figure |3l Tabled]). Hence, the line 
density is 2.8 GHz~^ with this sensitivity. We identified 16 funda mental molecular species 



and 16 is otopomers with the aid of spectral line databases CDMS ( jMiiller et al.ll200ll . 120051 ) 



and JPL (jPickett et al.lll998l ). The Vlsr value is assumed to be 6 km s~^. When identifying 
weak emission lines, we carefully confirmed them by checking the presence of other lines of 
the same species at other frequencies. In the 450 GHz band, 6 emission lines were detected, 
from which 3 molecular and one atomic species (C) were identified. The line identification 
list is given in Table [H and the individual line profiles are shown in Figure [31 

All the identified molecules consist of 3 heavy atoms or less. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is the 
heaviest molecule detected in this observation. Neither complex organic molecules nor long 
carbon-chain molecules were detected. Although this seems to be due to low abundances 
of heavy molecules, another possible reason would be insufficient excitation. In general, 
heavy molecules have small rotational constants, and hence, their rotational transitions in 
the submillimeter-wave region usually have high upper-state energies. For instance, the 
31o3i — 30o3o line of HCOOCH3 at 333 GHz has the upper state energy of 259 K. Similarly, 
the J = 38 — 37 line of HC3N at 346 GHz has the upper state energy of 323 K. Hence, 
excitation of such transitions requires high density and high temperature conditions. If 
the emitting region is small and the molecular abundance is not very high, the emission 
of the heavy molecules will hardly be detected in the submillimeter-wave band. Thus, the 
excitation condition would seriously limit the detectability of molecular lines, though this can 
sometimes be a merit of the submillimeter-wa ve observations in r educing the weed spectral 



lines to avoid the line confusion problem (e.g. iTercero et al.ll2010l ). 



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Very strong emission lines of fundamental molecules such as CO, HCN, HCO"'", and 
H2CO are readily seen in Figure [H In addition to them, we found very strong emission lines 
of CN (AT = 3 - 2) and CCH (A^ = 4 - 3) in R CrA IRS7B. Ten hyperfine components 
emission lines were detected for CN with the peak intensity of 2.9 K in Tmb, whereas 7 
hyperfine component lines were found for CCH with the peak intensity of 2.8 K (Figure [3]). 
Furthermore, 8 lines of C-C3H2 were also detected with moderate intensities. The strongest 
line of C-C3H2 is Sso — at 349.264 GHz, whose intensity is 0.23 K (Figure [3]). 

The NO ^Hi J = 7/2 — 5/2 lines were detected in this survey. One A-type doubling 
component is clearly seen, which is split into three hyperfine component lines. Another 
A-type doubling compone nt is partly blended with the CH3OH line. The NO molecule 
ha s been found in Sgr B 2 ( iLiszt &: Turner! 1 19781 ). the high-mass star-forr ning region OMC- 



jjIWootten et al.lll984f ). and cold dark clouds like L134N and TMC-1 flMcGonade et al. 



I990I ). This molecule is a reaction intermediate to form N2, and is one of key molecules to 
understand the nitrogen chemistry in the gas phase. 

As for the sulfur bearing species, three bright lines of SO, one line of CS, 2 lines of H2CS, 
one line of HCS"*", and 9 lines of SO2 were detected. Furthermore, the SO^ J = 15/2 — 13/2 
lines were possibly detected. Two A-type doubling components of SO^ are recognizable at 
347.470 GHz and 348.115 GHz with the confidence levels of 4a and 3a, respectively, although 
the lines suffer from the baseline distortion because of their low intensities, particularly for 
the lower A-type doubhng component (Figures [2] and E]). So far SO"*" has been detected 



in the shocked cloud associated with the sup ernova remnants ( IC443G; iTurnerl Il992l ) and 



(Woods 


1987; 


Turner 


I994I; 


Stauber et al. 


2007) 



In addition, we notice a few important non-detections. The J = 3 — 2 lines of CO^, 
which is thought to be abundant in PDRs, fall in the observed frequency range, but were 
not detected. Furthermore, the HOC"'" (J = 4 — 3) line was not found in this survey. The 
linear isomer of C-C3H2, I-C3H2, was not detected. Although (CH3)20 has a relatively low 
excitation line (550 — 441, Eu = 48.8 K) at 358.452 GHz, it was not visible in the present 
observations. 



3.2. Rotation Temperatures and Column Densities 

Assuming optically thin emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we de- 
termined the rotation temperatures and the beam-averaged column densities of CH3OH, 
SO2, and C-C3H2 from the 345 GHz band data by using the rotation diagram method (Table 



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|2]and FigureHj). As for C-C3H2, a special treatment is needed. Two of the 8 observed C-C3H2 
lines (351.782 GHz and 351.66 GHz) are composites of the ortho and para C-C3H2 lines with 
almost the same upper state energies. We included these two composite lines in the rotation 
diagram analysis by assuming the ortho-to-para ratio of 3. Here, we also assumed the same 
rotation temperature for the ortho and para C-C3H2. As for CCH and H2CO, we evaluated 
their rotation temperatures from the 345 GHz and 450 GHz band data, as shown in Table [2] 
and Figure HI where the beam filling factor is assumed to be the same for the both bands. 

As summarized in Table HI the rotation temperatures of C-C3H2 CH3OH, SO2, CCH, 
and H2CO range from 16 K to 31 K, being almost comparable to one another. The rotation 
temperatures are significantly higher than those (<10 K) found in cold dark clouds (e.g. 
Sakai et al.ll2008l ). On the ot her hand, they are much lower than that found in the typical 
hot corino IRAS 16293-2422 (jvan Dishoeck et~aL 1995 ). and comparable to those found for 
H2CO in low-mass protostellar sour ces without hot co rino activities such as L1157-mm and 
L1527 (18 K and 16 K, respectively: iMaret et al.ll2004l ). It should be noted that the rotation 
temperatures of C-C3H2 and CCH are similar to those of CH3OH and SO2 in R CrA IRS7B, 
suggesting that all these molecules are subject to the same physical conditions, and thus 
likely reside in the same region. Since the rotation temperatures are much lower than the 
upper state energies of the heavy molecules such as HCOOCH3 (31o3i — 30o3o; 259 K) and 
HC3N (J = 38 - 37; 323 K), these lines are hardly detected in R CrA IRS7B. 

The beam-averaged column densities of the other molecules were evaluated by assuming 
optically thin emission and LTE, where the excitation temperature was assumed to be 20 K. 
In order to see how the derived column densities depend on the assumed excitation temper- 
ature, the column densities were also calculated for the excitation temperatures of 15 K and 
25 K. Although the ratio of the column density estimated from the normal species line to 



that from the ^^C species line is close to the isotope abundance ratio of 60 (ILucas fc Liszt 
19981 ) for H2CO, the corresponding ratios for HCO"'", HCN, and HNC are found to be lower 
than 60. This indicates that the bright lines, such as the HCO^, HCN, and HNC lines, 
are not always optically thin. Therefore, we used the data of the ^^C species to derive the 
column densities of HCO"*", HCN, HNC, and H2CO, where the ^^C/^^C ratio was assumed to 
be 60. Furthermore, the ortho-to-para ratios were assumed to be 3 and 2 (statistical values) 
for H2CO and D2CO, respe ctively. Although the o rtho-to-para ratio of H2CO can be less 
than 3 in protostellar cores (jj0rgensen et al.ll2005bl . and references therein), we ignored this 
effect for simplicity. The derived column densities are summarized in Table [31 The column 
densities are sensitive to the assumed excitation temperature. A change in the excitation 
temperature by 5 K results in a change in the column densities by a factor of 2 - 3. 



In order to derive the beam-averaged column density of H2, iV(H2), we employed the 



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C"0 data. The A^(H2) value was evaluated to be (1.6 ± 0.3) x lO^^ crn-^, (1.0 ± 0.2) x 
10^3 cm-2, and (8.0 ± 1.7) x 10^2 cm-^, for T = 15 K, 20 K, and 25 K, respectively, b y 
assuming the N {C^'^ O) / N {B.2) ratio of 4.7 x 10"^ JPrerking et al.lll982l : ICaselh et al]ll999h . 
By using the derived A^(H2), the beam-averaged fractional abundances of molecules relative 
to H2 {X = N/N(B.2)) were evaluated, as listed in Table HI The effect of the assumed 
excitation temperature is compensated in the fractional abundances. The upper limits for 
some important molecules were also evaluated similarly by using the three times the r.m.s. 
noise at the expected frequency and the typical line width of 2 km s~^, as listed in Table IH 



3.3. Deuterium Fractionations 

Spectral lines of the deuterated molecules DCO^, DCN, CCD, HDCO, and D2CO, were 
detected in this survey. The column densities were derived under the assumption of LTE with 
Tex = 20 K, as in the case of the normal (non-deuterated) species. The column densities were 
also calculated for the excitation temperatures of 15 K and 25 K. The results are included 
in Table [31 The deuterium fractionation ratios are summarized in Table [51 A change in the 
assumed excitation temperature by 5 K does not make a significant change in the ratio. It 
should be noted that the deuterium fractionation ratio of D2CO is almost comparable to 
that of HDCO. 

The DCO^/HCO^ ratio is lower than the deut erium fractionat i on ra tios of the other 



species. The ratio is consistent with that reported by [Anderson et al.l (119991 ) (0.018 ±0.006). 
The DCO+/HCO+ ratio tends to reach its equilibrium ratio at the current temperature, 
since DCO"*" is readily destroyed by an electron recombination reaction. On the other hand, 
the neutral species have longer lifetimes, and their deuterium fractionation ratios mostly 
remain as they were in the starless phase (Sakai et al. 2011). 



4. Discussion 



4.1. Comparison with IRAS 16293-2422 



Our spectral line survey toward R CrA IRS7B is the second spectral line survey con- 
ducte d for a low- mass star-forrn i ng region after the prototypical hot corino source IRAS 16293- 
2422 (Ivan Dishoeck et al.[[l995[ : [Blake et al.[[l994j : [Caux et al.[[201l[ ). Hence, we compare the 
chemical composition of R CrA IRS7B with that of IRAS 16293-2422. Figure E shows a 
comparison of the fractional abundances of various molecules bet ween R CrA I RS7B and 
IRAS 16293-2422. The data for IRAS 16293-2422 are taken from iBlake et all Jl994l ) and 



- 9 - 



van Dishoeck et al.l ( 119951 ). where the abundances are derived under the same assumption as 
ours; constant Tex, no abundance variation within the source, and H2 column density from 
the CO observation. We can readily notice the following points: 



Blake et al. 


1986; 


Schilke et al. 


1997) 



hand, the SO2 lines are not as bright as in R CrA IRS7B. This feature can be confirmed 
quantitively in the fractional abundance. The abundance of SO2 in R CrA IRS7B is lower 
by one order of magnitude than that in IRAS 16293-2422. In contrast, the abundance of SO 
in R CrA IRS7B is almost comparable to that in IRAS 16293-2422. The other sulfur bearing 
organic species, CS, HCS"*", and H2CS, also have similar abundances to the IRAS 16293-2422 
case. 

(2) The CH3OH abundance is found to be lower by an order of magnitude than that in 
IRAS 16293-2422. The rotation temperature of CH3OH derived from the rotation diagram 
(31.0±6.8 K) is much lower than that reported for IRAS 16293-2422. The H2CO abundance 
is, on the other hand, comparable to that in IRAS 16293-2422, although the rotation tem- 
perature of H2CO (16.9l|^ K) is lower than that of CH3OH in R CrA IRS7B (Table E]). 

(3) Complex organic molecules, such as HCOOCII3, (0113)20, and C2H5CN, which are char- 
acteristic to hot corinos, are not detected. This result does not directly mean that these 
species are deficient in R CrA IRS7B, since these molecules might be difficult to be excited 
in the 350 GHz region, as mentioned before. Nevertheless, we can evaluate a meaningful 
upper limit for the (CH3)20 fractional abundance to be 4.7 x 10~^^ from the present observa- 



tion. This i s significantly 



(2.4 X 10"''; ICazaux et al 



ower than the (0113)20 fractional abundance in IRAS 16293-2422 
2003h. It is also lower than that in another hot corino, NGC 1333 



IRAS2A (3.0 X 10 ^: iBottinelli et al.ll2007 ). and that in the high-mass star-forming region, 
Ori KL (8.0 x lO'^i lBlake et al.lll986h . As for the abundance of (CH3)20 relative to CH3OH, 
we find the upper limit of 0.04 in R CrA IRS7B. This up per limit is slightly lower than the 
corresponding ratio reported for IRAS 16293-2422 (0.20: iHerbst fc van Dishoecljl2009l ). It 
should be noted that these comparisons are based on the beam-averaged abundances. For 
comparisons of the 'real' abundances, a detailed source model of R CrR IRS7B is necessary, 
which is left for future works. 

(4) The HON abundance is comparable to that in IRAS 16293-2422, whereas the HNC 
abundance seems to be lower. Hence, the HNC/HON ratio is slightly lower than in the 
IRAS 16293-2422 case. Howe ver, the ratio is w ithin the range of ratios for starless cores 
and low-mass prestellar cores ( iHirota et al.l 119981 ). In contrast, the ON abundance is much 
higher in R CrA IRS7B than that in IRAS 16293-2422. This may indicate the importance 
of the photodissociation effect in R CrA IRS7B, as discussed below. 

(5) The CCH emission is very bright in R CrA IRS7B. The CCH abundance is higher than 
that in IRAS 16293-2422 by more than one order of magnitude, although it is lower than that 



-lo- 



in the WCCC source L1527. The relatively high abundance of CCH could be regarded as a 
sign of WCCC. Alternatively, this may be another indication of the photodissociation effect. 
The abundance of C-C3H2 in R CrA IRS7B is almost comparable to that in IRAS 16293-2422. 
(6) The deuterium fractionation ratios of H2CO are generally lower in R CrA IRS7B than in 
IRAS 16293-2422. Th e HDCO/H^CO ratio is 050±0.024 in R CrA IRS7B, whereas it is 0.14 
in IRAS 16293-2422 Jvan Dishoeck et al.lEggsl ). Although D2CO is found in R CrA IRS7B 
and the D2CO/H2CO ratio is close to the HDCO/H 2CO ratio, these are general features 
for low- mass star- forming regions (jParise et al.ll2006l ). Similarly, the CCD/CCH ratio is 
0.038 ± 0.016 in R CrA IRS7B, which is lower than that in IRAS 16293-2422 (0.18). In 
contrast, the DCN/HCN and DCO+/HCO+ ratios in R CrA IRS7B are similar to those in 
IRAS 16293-2422, and in the range of the ratios reported for low-mass protostellar sources 
(|j0rgensen et al.ll2004l ). 



4.2. Origin of difference 



The chemical feature of R CrA IRS7B is completely different from that of IRAS 16293- 
2422, which is characterized by abundant complex organic molecules and SO2. The results 
(1), (2), (3), and (6) suggest that the hot corino activity is weaker than previously thought 
in R CrA IRS7B. It seems that the bright H2CO and CH3OH emission does not directly 
represent strong hot corino activities. On the other hand, molecules related to carbon-chain 
molecules such as CCH and C-C3H2 are relatively abundant, as mentioned in (5), and the 
deuterium fracti onation ratios are relatively low (6). These features are generally seen in 
WCCC sources (ISakai et al.ll2009bl ). However, longer carbon-chain molecules such as C4H 
and HC3N are not detected in the 345 G Hz band. Furtherm ore, the C4H line is not detected 



in the 3 mm observations using Mopra (jSakai et al.ll2009al ). Hence, R CrA IRS7B cannot 
definitively be categorized to the WCCC sources in the present stage. 

One possibility of the distinct chemical composition fro m the two categori es is that 
R CrA IRS7B has an intermediate characteristic between them. ISakai et al.l ( l2009al ) proposed 
that the difference between hot corinos and WCCC sources originates from different chemical 
compositions of the grain mantles caused by different duration time of the starless core phase. 
According to their scenario, the hot corino and WCCC sources are the two extremes, and the 
existence of sources with a mixture of these chemical characteristics is plausible. However, it 
is difficult to confirm or disprove this picture from the present observations, since the emission 
lines of long carbon-chain molecules and large complex organic molecules are difficult to be 
excited in the submillimeter-wave region. Rather this picture could be tested by observations 
in lower frequency bands. 



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Given the proximity of the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA located outside of the protostar 
R CrA IRS7B, the chemical cor nposition of the envel ope of R CrA IRS7B would be affected 
by the external UV radiation. IStauber et al.l (120071 ) discussed the effect of the FUV and 
X-ray radiation from protostars, based on their observation of CN, CO"*", SO, S0+, NO, and 
HCN. According to their resuh, the CN/HCN, CN/NO, SO+/SO, and CO+/HCO+ ratios 
are higher in the envelope of high-mass stars compared to those surrounding in low-mass 
stars. This trend is interpreted in terms of the photodissociation effect due to the bright 
FUV radiation from high-mass young stellar objects on their ambient envelopes. Compar- 
ing our results with theirs, we find that the abundance ratios of CN/HCN, CN/NO, and 
SO+/SO are evaluated to be 1.8, 0.7, and 0. 016, respective l y, wh ich are comparable to the 
ratios of high-mass star-forming regions as by lStauber et al.l ( 120071 ) (e.g 1.80, 0.21, and 0.007, 
respectively for W3 IRS5). On the other hand, these ratios are an order of magnitude higher 
in R CrA IRS7B than in IRAS 16293-2422. Therefore, the envelope of R CrA IRS7B could 
be affected by photodissociation. In this case, the source of the UV radiation is not the 
protostar within R CrA IRS7B but nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA which is situated at 39 
arcsec NW of R CrA IRS7B. Note that the C/CO ratio toward R CrA IRS7B is evaluated 
to be 0.06 - 0.09 by assuming the CO/H2 ratio of 10~^. This ratio is consistent with that 



found in the p Ophiuchi cloud illuminated by nearby B star (HD147889) (iKamegai et al. 



20031). Further more, the 4.62 "XCN" absorp tion 



R CrA IRS7B (IChiar et al.l Il998l : IWhittet et al. 



200 ih 



'eature is marginally detected toward 
Formation of "XCN" requires en- 



ergetic phenomena su ch as UV photolysis ( IGrim &: Greenberg||l987l ) and ion bombardment 
( iPalumbo et al.ll2000l ). This might also support the PDR picture mentioned above. 



As mentioned in Section 3.3, the deuterium fractionation ratios of the neutral species 
reflect the initial conditions in the prestellar cores before the onset of star formation. The 
low deuterium fractionation ratios may suggest that the parent core of R CrA IRS7B was 
so warm in the starless core phase that the CO molecule had survived against depletion. If 
the parent core was heated by the external UV radiation from R CrA, the low deuterium 
fractionation ratio could also be explained. 

Although the above results are consistent with predictions for PDRs, the other abun- 
dance ratios, which are also characteristic in PDR, show inconsistency. The CO"''/HCO"'" 
ratio is found to be < 0.002, which is much lower than those in high -mass star-forrriing r egions 
(0.016 - 0.066), and similar to that in hot corinos (0.002 - 0.001) Jstauber et aDl2007[ l. The 
H CO"'"/HOC^ ratio is evaluated to be > 714, which is higher than those in PDRs reported 
by iFuente et all J2003h (50 - 120 for the PDR in NGC 7023). Moreover, the UV source 
is located outside the protostellar envelope of R CrA IRS7B, in contrast to the high-mass 
star-forming regions where the UV sources are embedded inside the envelope. Therefore, the 
effect of FUV and X-ray on the chemical composition in R CrA IRS7B could be different 



- 12 - 



from the high-mass star-forming region case. For a further understanding of those effects, 
we need more detailed analyses, including a source model and chemical network studies. 

5. Summciry 

1. We have carried out a spectral line survey toward Class protostar R CrA IRS7B in 
Corona Austrahs dark cloud in the 345 GHz band with ASTE, as part of our multi- 
wavelength spectral line survey project of R CrA IRS7B. In this survey, 16 molecular 
species and 16 isotopomers are identified. We have also made a supplementary obser- 
vation in the 450 GHz band, where 3 molecular and one atomic species are detected. 

2. We have found very bright CN and CCH emissions, whereas the SO2 hues are not as 
prominent as in IRAS 16293-2422. The abundances of CN and CCH are higher than 
those in IRAS 16293-2422 by an order of magnitude. In contrast, the abundances of 
SO2 and CH3OH are much lower than those in IRAS 16293-2422. 

3. In the 345 GHz band, neither complex organic molecules nor long charbon-chain 
molecules, which consist of 4 heavy atoms or more, are detected. However, this does 
not directly mean that these species are deficient in R CrA IRS7B, since their emission 
lines in the submillimeter-wave region are difficult to be excited. 

4. Deuterium fractionation ratios are obtained for CCH, H2CO, HCN, and HCO+. They 
are less than 5 %. The HDCO/H2CO and CCD/CCH ratios are much lower than those 
reported for IRAS 16293-2422. 

5. Excitation temperatures of SO2, CH3OH, C-C3H2, H2CO, and CCH are all similar to 
one another, indicating that these molecules reside in the same region. Moreover, the 
excitation temperature of CH3OH is much lower than that found in IRAS 16293-2422. 

6. From these results, we find that the chemical composition of R CrA IRS7B is clearly 
different from that of hot corinos. However, R CrA IRS7B cannot be categorized to 
the WCCC sources, since long carbon-chain molecules, which are commonly found in 
WCCC source, are not detected. If the hot corinos and the WCCC sources are the 
two extremes with respect to chemical compositions of Class objects, R CrA IRS7B 
would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. 

7. Alternatively, the chemical composition of R CrA IRS7B would be significantly affected 
by the UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA, as indicated by the bright 
CN emission. The effect of the UV radiation has to be examined by detailed chemical 
models, which is left for future works. 



- 13 - 



8. A spectral line survey is a powerful technique to characterize the chemical features 
of the protostellar sources. The present survey indicates further chemical diversity in 
low-mass star-forming regions. Similar surveys toward the other low-mass star-forming 
regions are of particular importance to explore the origin of their chemical diversity. 

6. Acknowledgements 

The authors are grateful to the ASTE staff for excellent support. The research of JKJ 
is supported by a Junior Group Leader Fellowship from the Lundbcck foundation. The 
research in Copenhagen (JL, JKJ and SEB) is furthermore supported by a grant from In- 
strumentcentcr for Danish Astrophysics and by Centre for Star and Planet Formation, which 
is funded by the Danish National Research Foundation and the University of Copenhagen's 
programme of excellence for financial support. YW acknowledges to the Hayakawa Satio 
Fund awarded by the Astronomical Society of Japan. This study is supported by a Grant 
in Aid from the Ministory of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan 
(No. 21224002 and 21740132). 

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This preprint was prepared with the A AS macros v5.2. 



-17- 




Fig. 1. — Compressed spectrum of R CrA IRS7B observed in the 345 GHz band (upper), 
and its expansion in the vertical scale to show faint lines (lower). 



- 18 - 




Fig. 2.— Spectrum of R CrA IRS7B. 



- 19 - 



pi 
03 

02 



0,1 





337.6 



337.fi 



338 




339.4 339.6 



Fig. 2. — Continued 



-20- 



■§ 02 
0,1 




1 — 


1 1 


I 1 


1 1 










- ss 




1 - p 

b 










liJi.iJlMbl iu.limill.jy .Jtilfc Jlj i^klJlL 



J, 




343 



242 A 



242.6 



343.g 344 



Fig. 2. — Continued 



-21 - 




Fig. 2. — Continued 



- 22 - 




Fig. 2. — Continued 



-23- 




Fig. 2. — Continued 




mA 359.6 
%m finsqiwacy (GtlzJ 



Fig. 2. — Continued 



-25 - 



J, 




363.4 



363 .S 



Fig. 2. — Continued 




Fig. 2. — Continued 



-27- 




-28- 




Fig. 3. — Spectra of individual molecules observed in R CrA IRS7B. 




Fig. 3. — Continued 



-30- 




Fig. 3. — Continued 




Fig. 3.- 



Continued 



-32 - 




Fig. 3. — Continued 




Fig. 3. — Continued 



-34- 




Fig. 3. — Continued 



-35 - 




Fig. 4.— Rotation diagram plots for C-C3H2, CH3OH, SO2, CCH, and H2CO. 



- 36 - 




u u 
u 



S o 



to 



IS 



^ 

y 



^ y o ffi n 

a I " g ° 

u 



1 



u 



o 
u 
X 



_£2L 



O O 

w tJ tn 



^ s 



PI 



Fig. 5. — The fractional abundances (X) of fundamental molecules in R CrA IRS7B and 
IRAS 16293-2422 (upper figure) and relative fractional abundances between R CrA IRS7B 
and IRAS 16293-2422 ( lower figur e). The fractional a bunda nces in IRAS 16293-2422 are 
taken from lBlake et al.l (119941 ) and Ivan Dishoeck et al.l (119951 ). 



Table 1. Observed line parameters 



Prequencv 
GHz 


Molecule 


Transition 










Vlsr 
km 


Av 

km 


mK 


r.m.s. 
mK 


I lllU 

K*km s'^ 


332.505242 


SO2 


43 1 — 32 2 










5.3 


2.4 


70.3 


14.7 


0.17 ± 0.06 


334.673353 


SO2 


82 6 — 7i 7 










5.5 


1.9 


99.5 


14.5 


0.19 ± 0.06 


335.096782 


HDCO 


5l4 -4i3 










5.7 


2.2 


187.5 


12.5 


0.43 ± 0.07 


335.582005 


CH3OH 


7i -6i,A+ 










5.5 


2.3 


150.8 


13.8 


0.42 ± 0.08 


336.948590 


c - C3H2 


44 1 — 3i 2 










5.8 


1.9 


77.0 


15.7 


0.15 ± 0.07 


337.060988 




J = 3 - 2 










5.5 


1.8 


3969.8 


13.2 


7.85 ± 0.09 


337.396459 


Q34g 


J = 7-6 










5.9 


1.7 


333.3 


13.2 


0.65 ± 0.10 


337.580147 




iVj = 88 - 77 










5.9 


1.6 


71.2 


15.8 


0.14 ± 0.08 


338.083195 


H2CS 


10iio-9i9 










5.8 


1.9 


83.7 


13.8 


0.14 ± 0.07 


338.124502 


CH30H 


7o-6o,E 










5.7 


2.2 


252.5 


13.8 


0.63 ± 0.08 


338.203988 


c - C3H2 


551 - 440 










5.9 


1.5 


82.5 


13.8 


0.14 ± 0.07 


338.344628 


CH3OH 


7-i-6_i,E 










5.7 


2.3 


701.5 


13.8 


1.87 ± 0.10 


338.408681 


CH3OH 


7o-6o,A+ 










5.6 


2.3 


744.2 


13.8 


2.10 ± 0.10 


338.512627 


CH3OH 


74 -64,A- 










5.5 


3.3 


58.5 


16.0 


0.12 ± 0.07 


338.512639 


CH3OH 


74 -64,A+ 










- 


- 


- 


- 




338.540795 


CH3OH 


7i -6i,E 










4.9 


3.5 


67.0 


16.0 


0.21 ± 0.08 


338.614999 


CH3OH 


72 - 62,E 










5.7 


2.2 


179.7 


16.0 


0.42 ± 0.10 


338.721630 


CH3OH 


7i -6i,E 










5.4 


2.5 


329.8 


16.0 


0.85 ± 0.10 


338.722940 


CH3OH 


7_2-6_2,E 




















339.341459 


SO 


iVj = 33 - 23 










5.6 


2.0 


108.3 


15.2 


0.25 ± 0.10 


339.446777 


CN 


iV = 3-2, J = 


5/2 


-5/2,F = 


3/2 


-3/2 


5.6 


1.7 


59.8 


15.2 


0.11 ± 0.06 


339.475904 


CN 


N = 3-2,J = 


5/2 


-5/2,F = 


5/2 


-5/2 


5.7 


1.8 


82.3 


15.2 


0.16 ± 0.06 


339.499288 


CN 


N = 3-2,J = 


5/2 


-5/2,F = 


7/2 


-5/2 


5.4 


2.3 


47.7 


15.2 


0.11 ± 0.06 


339.516635 


CN 


N = 3-2,J = 


5/2 


-5/2,F = 


7/2 


-7/2 


5.8 


1.9 


197.7 


15.0 


0.40 ± 0.09 



Table 1 — Continued 



Frequency 
GHz 


Molecule 


Transition 










^LSR 
km 


km 


mK 


r.m.s. 

mK 


K*km 


339.857269 


3^80 


Nj - 


-89 — 73 










5.7 


2.2 


51.3 


15.0 


0.10 ± 0.08 


339.981 


U 














- 


- 


91.8 


15.0 


0.25 ± 0.08 


339.984 


U 














- 


- 


115.2 


15.0 


0.28 ± 0.08 


340.008126 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


5/2 


-3/2,F 


= 5/2 


- 5/2 


5.7 


2.2 


173.8 


18.2 


0.41 ± 0.12 


340.019626 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


5/2 


-3/2,F 


= 3/2 


- 3/2 


5.8 


1.7 


169.3 


18.2 


0.30 ± 0.11 


340.031549 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


5/2 


-3/2,F 


= 7/2 


- 5/2 


5.7 


2.3 


1386.1 


18.2 


3.47 ± 0.10 


340.035408 


CN 


N = 


= 3-2, J = 


5/2 


-3/2,F 


= 3/2 


-1/2 


5.8 


2.3 


1359.2 


18.2 


3.32 ± 0.10 


340.035408 


CN 


N = 


= 3-2, J = 


5/2 


-3/2,F 


= 5/2 


-3/2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


340.247770 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 7/2 


- 5/2 


5.6 


2.7 


2917.2 


18.2 


9.46 ± 0.13 


340.247770 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 9/2 


- 7/2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


340.248544 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 5/2 


- 3/2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


340.261773 


CN 


N = 


: 3 - 2, J = 


7/2 


- 5/2F = 


= 5/2 - 


- 5/2 


5.6 


2.0 


235.0 


18.2 


0.42 ± 0.08 


340.264949 


CN 


N = 


= 3-2, J = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 7/2 


- 7/2 


5.7 


1.9 


256.7 


18.2 


0.54 ± 0.09 


340.630692 


HC180+ 


J = 


4-3 










5.7 


1.6 


193.7 


21.0 


0.35 ± 0.11 


340.714155 


SO 


Nj-- 


= 87-76 










5.4 


2.7 


831.7 


21.0 


2.41 ± 0.13 


341.350229 


HCS+ 


J = 


8-7 










5.6 


2.5 


59.3 


17.8 


0.18 ± 0.09 


341.415639 


CH3OH 


7i- 


61, A- 










5.8 


2.5 


135.2 


17.8 


0.43 ± 0.11 


342.522128 


D2CO 


606 


- 5o5 










5.6 


1.6 


115.8 


20.2 


0.21 ± 0.12 


342.882850 


CS 


J = 


7-6 










5.8 


2.1 


5086.7 


20.2 


12.38 ± 0.13 


343.325713 


H^^CO 


5l5 


-4i4 










5.9 


1.5 


133.2 


20.3 


0.24 ± 0.10 


344.200109 


HC^^N 


J = 


4-3 










5.8 


1.5 


130.8 


20.2 


0.23 ± 0.09 


344.310612 


SO 


Nj-- 


= 83-77 










5.5 


2.7 


940.2 


20.2 


1.99 ± 0.13 


345.339769 




J = 


4-3 










6.0 


2.0 


435.2 


15.2 


0.95 ± 0.10 


345.795990 


12C0 


J = 


3-2 














34982.8 


16.2 


282.26 ± 0.25 



Table 1 — Continued 



Frequency 
GHz 


Molecule 


Transition 










^LSR 
km s"^ 


Av 

km 


Tmb 

mK 


r.m.s. 
mK 


K*km s-^ 


346.487 


U 












- 


- 


66.2 


13.3 


0.19 ± 0.07 


346.528481 


SO 


iVj = 89 - 78 










5.6 


2.5 


940.2 


12.7 


2.67 ± 0.08 


346.998344 


H13C0+ 


J = 4-3 










5.8 


1.7 


876.3 


12.7 


1.68 ± 0.07 


347.740011 


S0+ 


n = 1/2, J = 


15/2 - 


-13/2,/ 






5.6 


4.0 


58.0 


14.5 


0.23 ± 0.06 


348.115221 


S0+ 


n = 1/2, J = 


15/2 - 


- 13/2, e 






5.5 


1.7 


35.8 


12.3 


0.08 ± 0.06 


348.211153 




J = 4-3 










6.1 


1.0 


64.0 


12.3 


0.08 ± 0.05 


348.340814 




J = 4-3 










5.6 


1.4 


216.0 


12.3 


0.32 ± 0.06 


348.534365 


H2CS 


10l9-9i8 










6.0 


1.4 


95.8 


13.2 


0.13 ± 0.05 


349.263978 


c - C3H2 


550 - 441 










5.8 


1.4 


231.5 


12.0 


0.37 ± 0.06 


349.312832 


CCH 


iV = 4-3, J 


= 9/2 


-7/2,F 


= 4- 


4 


5.7 


1.3 


58.8 


12.0 


0.08 ± 0.04 


349.337706 


CCH 


iV = 4-3, J 


= 9/2 


-7/2,F 


= 5 - 


4 


5.3 


2.3 


2795.2 


12.0 


7.05 ± 0.09 


349.338988 


CCH 


N = A-3,J 


= 9/2 


-7/2,F 


= 4- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


349.399276 


CCH 


N = 4-3,J 


= 7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 4- 


3 


5.3 


2.4 


1922.0 


12.0 


4.89 ± 0.09 


349.400671 


CCH 


N = 4-3,J 


= 7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 3- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


349.414643 


CCH 


iV = 4-3, J 


= 7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 3 - 


3 


5.8 


1.9 


97.3 


12.0 


0.22 ± 0.06 


349.603614 


CCH 


iV = 4-3, J 


= 7/2 


-7/2,F 


= 4 - 


4 


5.7 


1.5 


124.2 


11.8 


0.22 ± 0.06 


349.629770 


CCH 


TV = 4- 3, J 


= 7/2 


-7/2,F 


= 4 - 


3 


5.2 


1.6 


73.2 


11.8 


0.13 ± 0.06 


349.645137 


CCH 


iV = 4-3, J 


= 7/2 


-7/2,F 


= 3 - 


3 


5.7 


1.8 


60.5 


11.8 


0.10 ± 0.05 


350.687730 


CH3OH 


4o-3_i,E 










5.6 


2.6 


479.0 


18.0 


1.54 ± 0.11 


350.689494 


NO 


n = i/2+,j-- 


= 7/2- 


-5/2,F-- 


= 9/2 


-7/2 












350.690766 


NO 


n = 1/2+, J = 


= 7/2- 


-5/2,F: 


= 7/2 


- 5/2 












350.694772 


NO 


n = 1/2+, J = 


= 7/2- 


-5/2,F-- 


= 5/2 


-3/2 


5.0 


1.0 


86.3 


18.0 


0.16 ± 0.09 


350.905119 


CH3OH 


li -Oo,A+ 










5.8 


2.1 


499.0 


18.0 


1.21 ± 0.12 


351.043524 


NO 


n = 1/2", J = 


= 7/2- 


-5/2,F-- 


= 9/2 


-7/2 


5.6 


1.7 


99.5 


16.0 


0.19 ± 0.09 



Table 1 — Continued 



Frequency 
GHz 


Molecule 


Transition 










^LSR 
km s"^ 


Av 
km s"^ 


Tmb 

mK 


r.m.s. 
mK 


K*km s-^ 


351.051469 


NO 


n = 1/2", J = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 7/2 


-5/2 


5.2 


2.5 


141.0 


16.0 


0.32 ± 0.09 


351.051705 


NO 


n = 1/2-, j = 


7/2 


-5/2,F 


= 5/2 


-3/2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


351.257223 


SO2 


53 3 — 42 2 










5.4 


2.2 


199.5 


16.0 


0.45 ± 0.10 


351.523271 


c - C3H2 


734 — 643 










5.8 


1.8 


47.7 


15.0 


0.11 ± 0.07 


351.768645 


H2CO 


5l5 - 4l4 










5.8 


2.2 


5459.3 


15.0 


14.07 ± 0.11 


351.781569 


c - C3H2 


lOi 10 — 9o9 










5.7 


1.9 


137.3 


15.0 


0.32 ± 0.09 


351.781569 


C - C3H2 


lOolo — 9i9 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


351.965934 


c - C3H2 


9i 8 — 82 7 










5.8 


1.9 


66.3 


15.0 


0.16 ± 0.09 


351.965939 


c - C3H2 


92 8 — 817 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


352.193636 


c - C3H2 


83 5 — 72 5 










6.0 


1.2 


45.7 


15.3 


0.05 ± 0.05 


352.345 


U 












- 


- 


86.8 


15.3 


0.16 ± 0.08 


353.811872 


Hi^CO 


5o 5 — 4o 4 










5.7 


1.9 


41.0 


15.2 


0.08 ± 0.06 


354.240092 


c - C3H2 


43 2 — 3o 3 










5.3 


1.8 


60.0 


14.5 


0.10 ± 0.06 


354.505477 


HON 


J = 4-3 










5.7 


3.1 


4353.0 


14.5 


4.71 ± 0.11 


355.439498 


H^^NC 


J = 4-3 










5.8 


1.1 


39.8 


12.8 


0.05 ± 0.04 


356.734223 


HCO+ 


J = 4-3 










- 


- 


19635.5 


12.8 


56.00 ± 0.14 


356.755190 


SO2 


IO46-IO37 










5.6 


1.7 


69.2 


12.8 


0.16 ± 0.06 


357.387580 


SO2 


II48 — II39 










5.7 


1.7 


28.2 


11.2 


0.05 ± 0.04 


357.581449 


SO2 


84 4 — 83 5 










5.3 


1.9 


34.0 


11.7 


0.05 ± 0.04 


357.671821 


SO2 


94 6 — 93 7 










5.5 


2.3 


78.3 


11.7 


0.04 ± 0.05 


357.871456 


D2CO 


624 — 523 










6.2 


1.0 


57.8 


11.7 


0.09 ± 0.05 


357.892442 


SO2 


74 4 — 73 5 










5.7 


1.6 


39.5 


11.7 


0.08 ± 0.05 


357.925848 


SO2 


64 2 — 63 3 










5.4 


2.7 


37.0 


11.7 


0.09 ± 0.06 


358.605800 


CH3OH 


4i -3o,E 










5.7 


2.1 


287.3 


11.8 


0.70 ± 0.08 



Table 1 — Continued 



Frequency 


Molecule 


Transition 






^LSR 


Av 




r.m.s. 




GHz 










km 


km 


mK 


mK 


K*km s-^ 


360.169778 


DCO+ 


J = 5-4 






5.8 


1.4 


438.5 


22.5 


0.65 ± 0.15 


360.618340 


CCD 


iV = 5 - 4, J = 


11/2 


-9/2 


5.6 


1.3 


179.8 


20.0 


0.30 ± 0.11 


360.674170 


CCD 


iV = 5-4, J = 


9/2- 


-7/2 


5.7 


1.5 


153.0 


20.0 


0.24 ± 0.12 


361.852251 


CH3OH 


81 -72,E 






4.9 


2.2 


49.3 


20.2 


0.10 ± 0.08 


362.045754 


DCN 


J = 5-4 






6.0 


1.4 


231.0 


19.5 


0.32 ± 0.11 


362.630303 


HNC 


J = 4-3 






5.9 


1.9 


4519.5 


19.0 


9.81 ± 0.13 


362.736048 


H2CO 


5o5 — 4o4 






5.9 


2.0 


3149.3 


19.0 


6.95 ± 0.14 


363.739820 


CH3OH 


72-6i,E 






5.8 


2.1 


226.0 


20.8 


0.51 ± 0.13 


303.945894 


112CU 


t>2 4 — 42 3 






5.9 


z.l 


oiU.U 


20. 5 


1 on 1 A 1 c 

1.29 ± 0.15 


436.660979 


CCH 


Ar = 5-4,J = 


11/2 


-9/2,F = 6-5 


5.6 


1.7 


2093.2 


223.8 


3.8 ± 1.3 


436.661819 


CCH 


AT = 5 - 4, J = 


11/2 


-9/2,F = 5-4 












436.723016 


CCH 


N = 5-4,J = 


9/2 - 


-7/2,F = 5-4 


5.4 


1.7 


1435.4 


223.8 


2.0 ± 1.4 


436.723910 


CCH 


N = 5-A,J = 


9/2 - 


-7/2,F = 4-3 












461.040768 


12C0 


J = 4-3 










35125.6 


141.7 


332.1 ± 1.8 


491.968369 


H2CO 


7l7 — 616 






5.9 


1.7 


1261.0 


162.7 


2.1 ± 0.8 


492.160651 


C 


^Pi -2 Po 






5.9 


3.9 


9179.8 


176.5 


35.5 ± 1.4 



-42 - 



Table 2: Results of the Rotation Diagram Analyses. 



Molecule 


r(K) 


N (cm- 




C-C3H2 


23.7 ±4.7 


(2.4 ±1.7) 


X 10^2 


CH3OH 


31.0 ±6.8 


(1.1 ±0.6) 


X 10^^ 


SO2 


22.3 ±4.9 


(1.2 ±0.7) 


X 10^^ 


CCH 


16.2 ±3.6 


(2.9 ±1.9) 


X lO^^ 


H2CO {K, = 1) 


16.911^ 


9 3+^-3 X 

f ■<-»_4,4 ^ 


IQ13 a 



"A column density of H2CO in the Ka = 1 state. 



-43 - 



Tabic 3. Cohimn Densities of Identified Molecules. 



Molecule T=15K T = 20K T = 25K 





(cm 






(cm 






(cm 






CCH 


(9.8 ± 2.1) 


X 


]^Ql4 


(5.5 ± 1.2) 


X 


10^4 


(4.1 ± 0.9) 


X 


1014 


CCD 


(4.5 ± 1.6) 


X 


10^^ 


(2.1 ± 0.7) 


X 


10^3 


(1.4 ± 0.5) 


X 


1013 


CN 


(2.6 ± 0.4) 


X 


10^^ 


(1.7± 0.3) 


X 


10^4 


(1.4 ± 0.2) 


X 


1014 


HCN ^ 


(1.7 ± 0.4) 


X 


10^^ 


(9.6 ± 2.1) 


X 


10^3 


(7.1 ± 1.5) 


X 


1013 


DCN 


(1.8 ± 0.6) 


X 


10^2 


(8.3 ± 2.6) 


X 


10^1 


(5.6 ± 1.8) 


X 


lOii 


HNC ^ 


(5.6 ± 1.4) 


X 


10^^ 


(3.1 ±0.8) 


X 


10^^ 


(2.3 ±0.6) 


X 


1013 


C^^O 


(7.4 ± 1.5) 


X 


10^^ 


(4.8 ± 1.0) 


X 


10^^ 


(3.9 ± 0.8) 


X 


lOi^ 


NO 


(3.8 ± 0.7) 


X 


10^^ 


(2.4 ±0.5) 


X 


lO^^ 


(1.9 ±0.4) 


X 


1014 


HCO+'' 


(1.8 ±0.4) 


X 


10^^ 


(1.0 ± 0.2) 


X 


10^4 


(7.4 ± 1.5) 


X 


1013 


DCO+ 


(7.1 ± 1.6) 


X 


10^^ 


(2.5 ±0.6) 


X 


lO^i 


(1.4 ±0.3) 


X 


lOii 


H2CO ^ 


(2.8 ± 1.1) 


X 


10^^ 


(1.4 ±0.6) 


X 


10^4 


(1.0 ±0.4) 


X 


1014 


HDCO 


(1.4 ±0.4) 


X 


1013 


(7.3 ± 1.8) 


X 


10^2 


(5.3 ± 1.3) 


X 


1012 


D2CO 


(7.8 ± 1.8) 


X 


10^2 


(4.3 ±0.8) 


X 


10^2 


(2.2 ±0.5) 


X 


1012 


CS 


(4.3 ± 0.9) 


X 


10^^ 


(1.6 ±0.3) 


X 


1014 


(9.6 ± 1.9) 


X 


1013 


HCS+ 


(1.1 ±0.4) 


X 


10^=^ 


(3.5 ± 1.4) 


X 


1012 


(1.9 ±0.8) 


X 


1012 


H2CS 


(9.5 ±4.2) 


X 


10^=^ 


(2.2 ± 0.7) 


X 


101=^ 


(1.0 ±0.3) 


X 


1013 


SO 


(8.4 ±1.0) 


X 


1014 


(2.5 ±0.3) 


X 


1014 


(1.3 ±0.2) 


X 


1014 


S0+ 


(1.1 ±0.2) 


X 


10^3 


(3.9 ±0.8) 


X 


1012 


(2.2 ±0.5) 


X 


IOI2 


c 


(9.1 ± 1.9) 


X 




(7.8 ± 1.6) 


X 


1017 


(7.4 ± 1.5) 


X 


1017 


(CH3)20 b 


< 6.2 X 10 


12 


< 4.8 X 


10 


12 


< 4.4 X 10 


12 


HOC+ ^ 


< 2.6 X 10 


11 


< 1.4 X 10 


11 


< 1.0 X 10 


11 


C0+ ^ 


< 3.6 X 10 


11 


< 2.3 X 10 


11 


< 1.8 X 10 


11 



^The spectral lines of the i3C species is used for evaluation of the 
column density, where the i2C/i3C ratio is assumed to be 60. 

i^The upper limit to the column density is estimated from the 3(T 
upper limit of the integrated intensity assuming the line width to be 
2.0 km/s. 



-44 - 



Table 4. Fractional Abundances Relative to H2. 



Molecule r=15K r = 20K r = 25K 



CCH 


(6.3 ± 1.8) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(5.3 ±1.5) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(4.8 ± 1.4) 


X 10- 


-9 


CCD 


(2.8 ±1.1) 


X 


10- 


-10 


(2.0 ± 0.8) 


X 


10- 


10 


(1.7 ±0.7) 


X 10- 


-10 


CN 


(1.7 ±0.4) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.6 ±0.4) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.6 ±0.4) 


X 10- 


-9 


HCN 


(1.1 ±0.3) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(9.3 ± 2.7) 


X 


10- 


10 


(8.5 ±2.5) 


X 10- 


-10 


DCN 


(1.1 ±0.4) 


X 


10" 


-11 


(8.1 ±3.0) 


X 


10- 


12 


(6.6 ±2.5) 


X 10- 


-12 


HNC 


(3.6 ± 1.2) 


X 


10- 


-10 


(3.1 ± 1.0) 


X 


10- 


10 


(2.8 ±0.9) 


X 10- 


10 


NO 


(2.4 ±0.7) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(2.3 ±0.6) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(2.2 ±0.6) 


X 10- 


-9 


HCO+ 


(1.1 ±0.3) 


X 


10 


-9 


(9.7 ±2.7) 


X 


10- 


10 


(8.8 ±2.5) 


X 10- 


10 


DCO+ 


(4.5 ± 1.4) 


X 


10" 


-12 


(2.5 ±0.7) 


X 


10- 


12 


(1.6 ±0.5) 


X 10- 


12 


H2CO 


(1.8 ±0.8) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.4 ±0.6) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.2 ±0.5) 


X 10" 


-9 


HDCO 


(9.0 ±2.9) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(7.1 ±2.3) 


X 


10- 


11 


(6.3 ±2.0) 


X 10- 


-11 


D2CO 


(5.0 ±1.5) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(4.2 ±1.2) 


X 


10- 


11 


(2.6 ±0.8) 


X 10- 


-11 


CH3OH 


(6.8 ±3.8) 


X 


10- 


-10 


(1.0 ±0.6) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.3 ±0.7) 


X 10- 


-9 


C-C3H2 


(1.5 ± 1.1) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(2.3 ±1.7) 


X 


10- 


11 


(2.9 ±2.0) 


X 10- 


-11 


cs 


(2.8 ±0.8) 


X 


10- 


~9 


(1.6 ±0.5) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.1 ±0.3) 


X 10- 


-9 


HCS+ 


(6.8 ±3.0) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(3.4 ± 1.5) 


X 


10- 


11 


(2.3 ± 1.0) 


X 10- 


11 


H2CS 


(6.0 ±3.0) 


X 


10- 


-10 


(2.2 ±0.8) 


X 


10- 


10 


(1.2 ±0.5) 


X 10- 


-10 


SO 


(5.4 ± 1.3) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(2.4 ±0.6) 


X 


10- 


-9 


(1.5 ±0.4) 


X 10- 


-9 


S0+ 


(7.2 ±2.1) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(3.8 ±1.1) 


X 


10- 


11 


(2.6 ±0.8) 


X 10- 


-11 


S02 


(7.9 ±4.9) 


X 


10- 


-11 


(1.2 ±0.8) 


X 


10- 


10 


(1.5 ±0.9) 


X 10- 


-10 


c 


(5.8 ±1.7) 


X 


10- 


-6 


(7.5 ±2.2) 


X 


10" 


-6 


(8.8 ±2.5) 


X 10- 


-6 


(CH3)20 


< 3.9 X 10 


-11 




< 4.7 X 


10 


-11 




< 5.2 X 10-^^ 




HOC+ 


< 1.6 X 10 


-12 




< 1.4 X 10 


-12 




< 1.2 X 10-12 




C0+ 


< 2.3 X 10 


-12 




< 2.2 X 10 


-12 




< 2.2 X 10-12 





-45 - 



Table 5: Deuterium Fractionation Ratios. 



Molecule 
CCD / CCH 
HDCO / H2CO 

D2CO / H2CO 
DCN / HCN 
DCO+ / HCO+ 



r = 15 K 
0.045 ± 0.019 
0.050 ± 0.024 

0.028 ±0.013 
0.010 ±0.003 
0.0040 ± 0.0012 



r = 20 K 
0.038 ±0.016 
0.050 ± 0.024 
0.030 ±0.013 
0.009 ±0.003 
0.0025 ± 0.0006 



r = 25 K 
0.035 ± 0.014 
0.052 ± 0.025 

0.0212 ±0.010 
0.0008 ±0.002 
0.0018 ± 0.0004